Sugar intake should be drastically reduced

“Sugar intake ‘should be halved’,” BBC News reports. The headline is prompted by a government report that recommends no more than 5% of our calorie intake should come from “free sugars”. The previous recommendation was 10%. The new advice says children aged 11 or over and adults should consume no more than seven teaspoons of added sugar a day – 30g, equal to less than a single can of Coca-Cola, which contains 39g.

Children should consume much less than that. The report recommends no more than 19g for children aged four to six (around the amount of sugar in a pouch of Capri Sun) and no more than 24g for children aged seven to 10 (around the amount of sugar in a Snickers bar). The BBC tells us “all age groups in the UK consume twice as much as this limit”, so the gulf between what is good for our health and what we actually do is now wider than ever.

The main sources of free sugars are sugar-sweetened drinks, cereal, chocolate, sweets, fruit juice and added sugar at the table. The Mail Online said that, “Hitting [this] new target will mean cutting out almost all fizzy drinks from diet” and that, “Crisps and chocolate bars will need to become [a] once or twice-week luxury”. Experts generally welcomed the new recommendations, considering them evidence-based and balanced. But some cautioned against too much of a focus on sugar, warning fat is also an important source of calories and should not be overlooked.

The government has reportedly accepted the new recommendations, which will be used as part of a wider strategy to tackle obesity. This report confirms most of us are consuming way too much sugar and it is damaging our health and our kids’ health. But it is one thing setting out what people should aspire to eat to be healthy and quite another making it happen.

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Sugar intake should be drastically reduced

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